FRG Logo Design

cobra-logo

A vital part of every unit’s success is family. While Soldiers are in the field or spending long days away from home, spouses and children are left to take care of everyday life.  Not having a family prepared for the stress of military life and normal life can lead to the ultimate downfall of if a unit can complete it’s mission.  To help with these stresses, units often create Family Readiness Groups or FRGs.  The FRG serves as a safe place for all Soldiers and families to handle issues while the Soldier is away, but also creates a support group for families and children.

Cobra Battery is currently in transition with our FRG as our former leaders have moved on to other units.  For this logo project, I hoped to create a symbol to be used for emails and other event publications so that C Battery had an identity as an FRG.

For research, I looked first at the Army FRG website https://www.armyfrg.org/skins/frg/home.aspx. I found that this page didn’t really have a core logo, but that it had many programs under the umbrella of FRG and buttons on the website.  The button that caught my attention was the “subscribe” button. This button was a simple outline with basic shapes of a man and a woman.  Along the line of simple shapes to make people, I looked at http://www.bbbs.org/ the Big Brothers Big Sisters program logo, with this I had the needed inspiration for my design.

I started my logo with a circle to serve as the base of the design.  I chose a comfort color yellow to serve as a relaxing background.  I applied a circular gradient to the background.

Next, I used the ellipse tool to make the bodies of the family.  I chose to use a stereotypical family makeup, but also wanted to make it non-gender or race specific so that it could serve as everyone’s logo.  I then made the arm’s for the parents using polygon tool for a triangle and dragging the anchors to my liking.  I duplicated and reflected the arm and made it a smaller size to fit the other adult. Upon suggestions from my classmates, I moved the arms so that they further embraced the children.  For the colors, I chose colors from the base color palette and applied radial gradients on the heads and linear gradients on the rest of the body parts. I also applied a drop shadow from suggestions of my peers and my self-critique to allow the bodies to have more depth.  I also adjusted the red parent’s head gradient so that it was more symmetrical to the other heads.

Finally, I applied an arched text along the top and an unaltered text along the bottom. My initial selection of text did not look appealing to me, I also received critiques from my peers, so I decided to change the font of the upper text to “Perpetua” and changed the arch so that it did not distort the text. I decided to make the lower text bold and a little larger so that it was not overshadowed by other parts of the image.

The critiques I received for my design really helped develop my design into a stronger logo.  What was even better was viewing the work of my classmates who helped inspire me and allow me to see the capabilities that Illustrator has for logo creation. I hope this design is beneficial to the program and creates an image of solidarity for the familes.

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